This Floating Wind Turbine Looks Like a Stubby Shark

As seem on the Weather Channel 02/05/2015 with Sam Champion and Jim Cantore.

Its inventors say it can reach more powerful winds than boring, land-based turbines.

John Metcalfe Feb 4, 2015

http://www.citylab.com/tech/2015/02/this-floating-wind-turbine-looks-like-a-stubby-shark/385148/

Floating Wind Turbines Hover Above Areas In Need Of Power

By Ross Brooks on April 3, 2014 in Technology

For decades, wind turbines have required cranes and huge towers to lift a few hundred feet off the ground where winds can be slow and gusty. We are excited to demonstrate that modern inflatable materials can lift wind turbines into more powerful winds almost everywhere—with a platform that is cost competitive and easy to setup from a shipping container

In addition to remote parts of the world, the Buoyant Airborne Turbine (BAT) will also be able to provide relief in disaster-stricken areas. Before it can be deployed around the world, the technology will undergo a real world test to supply power and cell phone services to the city of Fairbanks, Alaska.

The idea’s potential to increase output and reduce energy costs has already attracted funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the California Energy Commission, and most recently, a $1.3 million grant from the Alaska Energy Authority.

To learn more about this amazing piece of technology, check out the video below.

Altaeros Energies

The BAT harnesses extreme high-altitude winds to generate sustainable energy.

A new helium-filled wind turbine that floats 1,000 feet in the air has been proven to generate twice as much power as a conventional turbine tower. Designed and built by the startup Altaeros Energies, the floating wind turbine can also provide data coverage, cell service and local weather data to remote communities.

http://www.altaerosenergies.com/

The inflatable power plant can make use of winds five to eight times more powerful than those found at a few hundred feet, which is the average height for a traditional wind turbine. Cables tethered to the ground not only provide a way to send power back down to Earth, but also secure the blimp – which is tough enough to withstand severe weather conditions.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s